Species Management Reports

Below you will find links to our Species Management Reports.

 

 

American Crow Management

 

 

The American crow (Corvusbrachyrhynchos) is one of the most recognizable birds across the United States and Canada. It is widely distributed, breeding in the southern half of Canada and living year-round in almost all of the United States, save some of the drier southwestern deserts. The American crow can be found in a wide variety of habitats as well. Crows are often foundin open woodlands, forests, agricultural fields, woodlots, and even beaches. They also do very well in suburban settings, often being seen in parks, cemeteries, parking lots, and in or around towns.

View the Document

Black Bear Management

 

 

The American black bear (Ursus americanus) is the smallest bear species inhabiting North America. Black bears range from Alaska to Mexico, including 40 states in the United States. Black bears historically ranged throughout out most of the forests of North America. Historic populations of black bears declined from habitat loss and overexploitation. However, black bear populations are currently growing and their range is rapidly expanding. Black bears inhabit various types of habitat, including as hardwood forests, dense swamps, and forested swamps.

View the Document

Canada Goose Management

 

 

The Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is a common waterbird found throughout North America. Canada geese are distinguished from other goose species by their white cheek patch that contrasts with a black head, bill, and neck. Canada geese are also well known for their distinctive honking call, and v-shaped flight formations during migrations. They can live up to 24 years in the wild and have a large body size (6.6 to 19.8 lbs).

View the Document

Double-Crested Cormorant Management

 

 

The Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is the most abundant and most widely distributed species of the 6 North American cormorants. This bird can be found breeding and wintering on both the East and West coasts and is also found inland at bodies of water in Canada as well as the United States at different times of the year. Not always found in the Great Lakes Basin, a population present in the prairies spread eastward and began nesting in the Great Lakes region in 1913.

View the Document

European Starling Management

 

 

European starling is a native to Europe and was introduced to North America in the 1890s by William Shakespeare enthusiasts. Since the introduction of 100 individuals in Central Park, New York; starlings colonized the majority of North America, ranging from Alaska to Mexico; with an estimated population of over 200 million.

View the Document

Gull Management

 

 

Gulls consist of a group 23 species of birds in North America and 44 worldwide. They can generally be identified by their hooked beaks, long tapered wings, robust bodies, and webbed feet. The adults of these species are white with gray and black on wings, back, and head. The different species of this group are further identified by variations in these color patterns. Two of the most common and widespread gull species are the herring gull (Larusargentatus)and ring-billed gull (Larusdelawarensis).

View the Document

Mourning Dove Management

 

 

Mourning doves are one of the most widespread and abundant birds in all of North America; their numbers can be attributed to their annual brood size that ranges from 2-6 individuals. Furthermore, they have acclimated to rapid urbanization in the United States and have thus filled new niches, allowing them to be a prolific species.

View the Document

Red Tailed Hawk Management

 

 

The red-tailed hawk is the most common and widespread hawk throughout North America. It is a predatory animal that feeds primarily on small mammals such as rodents and rabbits; however, they will also feed on reptiles, fish and even larger insects. The red-tailed hawk is well adapted to almost any habitat as long as there are open areas interspersed with patches of trees and/or other elevated perches (Polite and Pratt, 1990).

View the Document

 

Turkey Vulture Management

 

 

The turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) is a widespread raptor throughout the United States, which has developed a highly successful niche in nature as a forest scavenger. The population success of this raptor can be attributed to its highly developed sense of smell, allowing it to detect viable food sources (such as dead animals) from large distances (Owre and Nothington, 1961). Furthermore, their ability to exhume carcasses allows the turkey vulture to exploit nutritional resources that are often buried and cached by other land mammals and bird species (Whitaker and Hamilton, 1998).

View the Document

Waterfowl Management on Lakes and Reservoirs

 

Population levels of Canada geese (Branta Canadensis) have increased dramatically over the past four decades, increasing from 1.08 to 5.01 million birds from 1970 to 2005. As the population of Canada geese continues to grow, the birds come into contact with humans more frequently. This interaction has resulted in several different types of human-goose conflicts. Waterfowl can cause many major issues on reservoirs, lakes and other water bodies.

 

View the Document

White-Tailed Deer Management

 

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common wildlife species found throughout the majority of North America due to their adaptability and successful reproduction rate. As an edge species, white-tailed deer are not restricted to one type of habitat, but can be found in a wide variety of settings.

View the Document

 

Wood Chuck Management

 

Annually on February 2nd, many people look to the familiar groundhog to predict the duration of the ongoing winter. Does the ground hog see its shadow and scurry back into its hole resulting in 6 more long weeks of wintery cold? Or, does the groundhog remain outside its den and indicating a shorter end to the cold season? While many view the emergence of the groundhog as a welcome sight, many airports should remain aware of the potential hazards the fury brown animal poses to aviation safety.

View the Document